Liber Novus

Liber Novus

Presents the Swiss psychologist's thoughts, experiences, and everything he felt after a period of time spent seeing visions, hearing voices, and inducing hallucinations.

The Red Book: A Reader's Edition

A Reader's Edition

The Red Book: A Reader's Edition

A portable edition of the famous Red Book text and essay. The Red Book, published to wide acclaim in 2009, contains the nucleus of C. G. Jung’s later works. It was here that he developed his principal theories of the archetypes, the collective unconscious, and the process of individuation that would transform psychotherapy from treatment of the sick into a means for the higher development of the personality. As Sara Corbett wrote in the New York Times, “The creation of one of modern history’s true visionaries, The Red Book is a singular work, outside of categorization. As an inquiry into what it means to be human, it transcends the history of psychoanalysis and underscores Jung’s place among revolutionary thinkers like Marx, Orwell and, of course, Freud.” The Red Book: A Reader’s Edition features Sonu Shamdasani’s introductory essay and the full translation of Jung’s vital work in one volume.

The Red Book of Varieties and Schemes

The Red Book of Varieties and Schemes

"The book under review is a reprint of Mumford's famous Harvard lecture notes, widely used by the few past generations of algebraic geometers. Springer-Verlag has done the mathematical community a service by making these notes available once again.... The informal style and frequency of examples make the book an excellent text." (Mathematical Reviews)

The Red Book

The Red Book

In detailed illustrations, a young girl crosses oceans and continents to meet a new friend, in a wordless book-within-a-book story.

The Red Book Hours

Discovering C.G. Jung's Art Mediums and Creative Process

The Red Book Hours

In 1913, psychiatrist and psychoanalyst Carl Gustav Jung (1875?1961) experienced an episode of psychosis, seeing visions and hearing voices in what he called a horrible ?confrontation with the unconscious.? But, instead of seeking to minimize the hallucinations after this initial episode, Jung believed there was tremendous value in this unconscious content and developed methods to encourage hallucinations. Over some sixteen years, he recorded his experiences in a series of small journals, which he later transcribed in a large, red, leather-bound volume, commonly known as 'The Red Book'. Jung never published the Liber Novus, as he called this pivotal part of his oeuvre, and left no instructions for its final disposition, and it therefore remained unpublished until recently.0'The Red Book Hours' complements the facsimile edition and English-language translation of 'The Red Book', published in 2009, and draws out the insights into Jung?s affinity with art as a means of personal insight.

Fred Read the Red Book

Fred Read the Red Book

Photographs and simple text introduce homophones, words that sound alike but are spelled differently and have different meanings.

The Little Red Book

The Little Red Book

Filled with practical information for those first days of sober living, this little book:* offers newcomers advice about the program, how long it takes, and what to look for in a sponsor* provides in-depth discussions of each of the Twelve Steps and related character defects* poses common questions about AA and helping others, identifying where to find answers in the Big Book* features non-sexist language.

The Red Book of the Exchequer

The Red Book of the Exchequer

A rich resource for medieval historians, this three-volume compilation of legal and administrative documents was first published in 1896.

The Red Book

The Red Book

Franoise, an Australian photographer, travels to Bhopal in India, where twenty years earlier a gas leak killed thousands. There she meets Naga, a Tibetan refugee whose family died in the disaster, and Arkay, a Scottish traveller battling addiction who has found solace in Buddhism. As a testament to their time together Franoise assembles photographs from their lives into an album, the Red Book. The photographs tell their stories of love, struggle and transformation - pointing to the people they have been and who they will become.

Jung's Nietzsche

Zarathustra, The Red Book, and “Visionary” Works

Jung's Nietzsche

This book explores C.G. Jung's complex relationship with Friedrich Nietzsche through the lens of the so-called 'visionary' literary tradition. The book connects Jung's experience of the posthumously published Liber Novus (The Red Book) with his own (mis)understanding of Nietzsche's Zarathustra, and formulates the hypothesis of Jung considering Zarathustra as Nietzsche's Liber Novus –– both works being regarded by Jung as 'visionary' experiences. After exploring some 'visionary' authors often compared by Jung to Nietzsche (Goethe, Hölderlin, Spitteler, F. T. Vischer), the book focuses upon Nietzsche and Jung exclusively. It analyses stylistic similarities, as well as explicit references to Nietzsche and Zarathustra in Liber Novus, drawing on Jung's annotations in his own copy of Zarathustra. The book then uses Liber Novus as a prism to contextualize and understand Jung's five-year seminar on Zarathustra: all the nuances of Jung's interpretation of Zarathustra can be fully explained, only when compared with Liber Novus and its symbology. One of the main topics of the book concerns the figure of 'Christ' and Nietzsche's and Jung's understandings of the 'death of God.'